Innovating for a Brighter Tomorrow: A Professional Development MiniConference

Venue:

Innovating for a Brighter Tomorrow: A Professional Development MiniConference

Vancouver,  

Time:

From  2019-05-11 15:30:00  to  2019-05-11 23:00:00
Event Description
What does the future of higher education look like? How will we be teaching, learning, and working in the coming decades? Is it possible for the world to become more human centered while being shaped by technology? Join us at the CICT Spring Mini-Conference to explore these and many other questions. Come early for the keynote "Exploring the Future: Skills for the Next Chapter" by Dean Laura Nissen and stay until the afternoon to experience the Graduate Student Innovation Panel. SCHEDULE 8:30-9:00 Breakfast 9:00-10:00 Keynote Address: A Walk in the Future: Skills for the Next ChapterLaura Nissen, Dean and Professor, School of Social Work For the last 50 years, a set of emerging frameworks and practices have been developed to refine and better apply, deep and concentrated effort in imagining an array of futures (both positive and negative) and aligning our readiness to meet whatever comes. Futures practice is an interdisciplinary established field and worthy of consideration here at Portland State University and beyond. Going beyond, but including, strategic planning and design-related thinking – it involves skills of “foresight” and an ability to conduct and then apply deep scans of ecosystem factors and then apply them in creative ways, aligning them with human-centered values such as equity, justice, freedom and progress. Join us for a conversation about a recent “walk in the future” with a report from Dean Laura Nissen, School of Social Work at Portland State University, from her recent attendance at the 50th Anniversary Institute for the Future conference in Palo Alto, CA, and her ongoing work in this area. About Laura NissenDean and Professor Laura Burney Nissen has been a member of the PSU/School of Social Work community since 2000. She began her tenure at PSU in a leadership role with the national Robert Wood Johnson Foundation initiative Reclaiming Futures (still operating in the Regional Research Institute in the SSW). With a long-term commitment to innovative systems change (her research portfolio includes a focus creativity and innovation in macro level social work systems change), Laura has worked with futures practice and lenses throughout her career. She credits a futures lens with the extended and continuous success of the Reclaiming Futures initiative and its ability to energize and provide architecture to a complex and interdisciplinary juvenile justice reform effort extending beyond a decade beyond its original “demonstration” phase. She has brought futures thinking into the School of Social Work in the form of a first strategic plan at the school in its 55 year history. She is in the final stages of completing her training as a foresight practitioner with the Institute for the Future, and has spoken on futures thinking in social work and social change at the National Association of Deans and Directors of Schools of Social Work. Laura remains active in the addictions policy arena as a member of the Oregon Governor’s Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse Policy, and in addition to futures study is actively engaged in research on the intersection of the arts and social change. She is also a calligrapher/bookbinder and a lover of waterfalls. 10:10-12:00 Session 1  Experiential Introduction to Critical Pedagogy Vicki Reitenauer, Faculty, Women, Gender, and Sexuality StudiesIn this session, we will collectively explore a variety of ideas about, approaches to, and possibilities for critical pedagogy through actively engaging in it together. This dynamic session will center each participant as the expert on their own experiences as learners and teachers and will invite us to surface insights about critical teaching and learning through self-reflection, discussion, and experiential activities. Participants will leave with inspiration to deepen their commitment to and facility with critical pedagogy and a plan for operationalizing critical approaches in their own pedagogical work. Building Better Research AssignmentsJoan Petit, Humanities and Social Sciences LibrarianFrustrated that your students aren't using high quality sources in their research papers? Your students are probably frustrated, too! In this interactive session, learn how you can inspire better papers and deeper learning from your students with some tweaks to assignment design. Improving Student Engagement through Active LearningCarl Snyder, Physics, and Emmanuel Abdul, ChemistryIn this interactive workshop, explore how you can increase student motivation and engagement by rethinking your class time and incorporating active learning techniques into your teaching strategies. What’s the Deal with Open Education?  (50 min) Needs to be in the morningScott Robison, Ph.D., Associate Director, Digital Learning and DesignShould you consider an Open Education approach to teaching and learning? What value does it have to you as an instructor? What value does it provide students? This overview of the Open Education Movement will help you answer these questions and consider how you can use Open Educational Practices in your classroom. Peer Review Workshops: Helping students help themselves Lauren Hobson, MFA - Nonfiction ’19Peer review workshops, when well designed, are one of the best ways to engage students in their own work. Whether it’s workshopping a research question, lab report, or essay, students are often able to identify and improve the work of their peers when given the space to discuss and revise one another’s work. Together, we’ll discuss how peer review can fit into different disciplines, go through best practices, and establish guidelines for a successful peer review workshop. Mindfulness Moment: A PSU Healthy Campus InitiativeMarcy Hunt, PhD - Director, Counseling ServicesStress is one of the greatest academic impediments for Portland State students. Similarly, for faculty and staff we know stress impacts attendance, productivity and satisfaction in the workplace. Since Spring 2018, the Healthy Campus Initiative has introduced students, faculty and staff to the benefits of a mindfulness practice in the classroom through the Mindfulness Moment. Come learn about our pilot program and how you too can incorporate mindfulness in your classrooms. 12:00-1:00 CICT Awards Luncheon  1:10-3:00 Session 2 Code Switching, Authenticity, and Communication Effectiveness Demian Lucas, CommunicationsCode switching can be an effective way to relate to others. By shifting language, tone and non-verbal communication tactics the speaker may be able to connect with others more quickly and easily. Essential to understanding this communication tactic is the process by which meaning is created; through interaction with others or self. There are also cautions related to code switching as excessive switching may be impractical and inauthentic. Understanding these ideas will enrich participant interpersonal  communication effectiveness.The session will explicate and explore code switching, meaning creation and discuss their impact within a dynamic and diverse environment. Participants will have an opportunity to evaluate and potentially improve their communication practices. How to turn BORING Papers (ugh) into EXPLORING ProjectsTina Penman, Audiologist and Regional Research AdministratorParticipants will become empowered to transform their humdrum paper assignments into exciting projects that students can’t wait to explore. We will brainstorm ways to effectively market a project, share parameters for a grading rubric, and acknowledge the benefits to you and the students. An Introduction to Universal Design for LearningSamantha Johns, Accessible Media Coordinator, OAI Universal Design for Learning (UDL) was inspired by advances in cognitive neuroscience research that informs the design of environments that support all learners. In this Workshop we will consider how to involve your students in the learning process and how to present essential course content in ways that connect to diverse learners and increase the likelihood of information access, comprehension, and effective instruction. Promoting Student-Centered Equity Mindfulness via an Campus Equity Walkthrough Evaluation Dr. Óscar Fernández (Comparative Literature Ph.D.), osf@pdx.eduUniversity Studies faculty & Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion CoordinatorAffiliate Faculty, Dept. of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies & School of Gender, Race, and NationsThe workshop will show how a Campus Equity Walkthrough Evaluation (CEWE) eWorkbook helps promote student-centered equity mindfulness on college campuses. Participants will receive an electronic copy of the eWorkbook. Using Social Media as a Professional ToolErin Spottswood Mind Mapping as Creative Problem Solving Alicia Milligan, GTA, Geography and Amy Hemingway, GTA, ESMLearn how to open your mind and allow your thoughts to become spatially organized in a creative and logical manner. This workshop will provide you with the tools and techniques needed to engage your students and yourself in an innovative  way of visualizing how to organize a thought process. Mind mapping is inclusive to all learning styles and can be adapted to any classroom setting or topic. Imposter Syndrome: Overcoming Self-Doubt Both In and Out of the ClassroomAmanda E. Ramirez, PhD, Psychologist, Center for Student Health and CounselingThis is an interactive workshop in which participants will explore the ways in which imposter syndrome manifests both in and out of the classroom. The workshop will include experiential exercises that will allow participants to practice coping with self-doubt. Participants will leave with skills to over-come self-doubt and ideas on how to help others who struggle with imposter syndrome. 3:00-5:00 Lead GTA Innovation Panel: Proposing Innovations to Improve Our Fields Katherine Lupton: The New 100-Level Spanish Sequence: A Comprehensible Approach Lauren Hobson: What do GTAs know about teaching and learning writing? Amy Hemingway: A Proposal for a Minor in Environmental Science and Solutions Bassam Haddad: Practical Computing in Daily Life Requests for Reasonable Accommodations:Requests for reasonable accommodations for faculty and staff may be made to Kristie Kolnesnikov at oai@pdx.edu. In order to ensure that reasonable accommodations are provided in time, please make your requests as soon as possible.